Friday, February 12, 2016

Truth Rising from Her Well to Shame Mankind

--Jean-Léon Gérôme, Truth Rising from Her Well to Shame Mankind, 1896

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

The "Jiggly" Scenes

The National Federation for Decency boasts about 20,000 members. Its first and best known project involved monitoring prime-time television that might appeal to "man's prurient nature." Each monitor spent one night a week tallying televised incidents of violence, profanity, and "skin." As The Wall Street Journal reported at the time, "One monitor, a woman, cited the September 13 episode of Charlie's Angels for 23 'jiggly' scenes. Another monitor, also a woman, didn't note any such scenes. Mr. [Donald] Wildmon[, head of the National Federation for Decency,] says, 'I'd just use the higher estimate and not bother with the other one.'"

--"The Indecent Crusade." Playboy Oct. 1984: 13.

Monday, February 8, 2016

The Best of the Moving Pixels Podcast: Love Stories in Video Games

Since we began publishing the Moving Pixels podcast on a biweekly (rather than weekly) basis a couple years ago, I have had a scheduling hole on Mondays that I have never quite seemed able to fill in the Games section at PopMatters.

My wife had what I consider to be a rather scathingly brilliant idea over the weekend. We have about six years worth of podcasts (about 200 episodes) sitting over on the Soundcloud servers, so why not fill the hole by creating a Best of the Moving Pixels podcast feature to post during those off weeks?

So, this is a discussion from 2010 about love stories in video games. Hopefully, it is of interest to those that have never heard it before or is a pleasant bit of nostalgia for those that did.

The Best of the Moving Pixels Podcast: Love Stories in Video Games

Thursday, February 4, 2016

Undressing Kratos

If you want a man to represent brutality, in the end you're going to end up taking his clothes off.

Undressing Kratos

Wednesday, February 3, 2016

The Didact and the Analyst: Learning How to Not Get Screwed Playing Tharsis

After hyping Tharsis to a friend who is a board gamer (not so much a video gamer) as an extremely difficult digital board game, I was slightly annoyed when he won his first game. Assuming I'm not just being a crybaby about it, though, I tried to examine what this experience indicates about how we learn to play games.

The Didact and the Analyst: Learning How to Not Get Screwed Playing Tharsis

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Monday, February 1, 2016